Middlebury looks to turn manure, food waste into energy

The Goodrich Family Farm in Salisbury will be the site of a new anaerobic digester that will produce renewable natural gas for the College.

Vermont Business Magazine Middlebury College will significantly reduce its carbon footprint thanks to an innovative partnership with Goodrich Family Farm in Salisbury, Vt., Vanguard Renewables of Wellesley, Mass., and Vermont Gas. Representatives from the four organizations involved discussed the partnership at a press briefing on November 16 at the College’s Kirk Center. 

Under the terms of a recently signed agreement, Vanguard Renewables will construct, own, and operate a facility at Goodrich Family Farm that will combine cow manure and food waste to produce Renewable Natural Gas (RNG). Gas produced by the Farm Powered* anaerobic digester will travel by pipeline to Middlebury College’s main power plant. Middlebury has agreed to purchase the bulk of the facility’s output. 

“We are constantly looking at new ways to make our energy sources more sustainable and diverse, and the digester project is a great opportunity to do that,” said David Provost, executive vice president for finance and administration at Middlebury College. “In 2016, the College reached its goal of carbon neutrality. We want to maintain that goal and keep improving on it. The digester will enable us to further decrease our use of carbon-based fuels.

“The College is excited to partner with the Goodrich Family Farm, Vermont Gas, and Vanguard Renewables, a national leader in its field,” added Provost. Vanguard currently owns and operates three anaerobic digesters located in Massachusetts.

Beyond the renewable energy produced by the digester, the facility will create high-quality, liquid fertilizer that will reduce the farm’s reliance on chemical fertilizers. The farm will also benefit from lower energy costs, free heat for farm use, fewer greenhouse gas emissions, and an annual lease payment for hosting the anaerobic digester facility. Located on more than 2,200 acres, the Goodrich Family Farm is a generational dairy farm with 900 milking cows. The farm is a member of the Agri-Mark Cabot Creamery Cooperative.

Once it is built, the digester at the Goodrich Family Dairy Farm (pictured above) will produce the largest amount of RNG of any digester in Vermont. Photos by Todd Balfour.

“The digester offers help with many of the challenges we face as farmers,” said Chase Goodrich, who is among the fourth generation of his family to operate the farm. “We want to diversify our income sources and find new ways to be environmentally friendly. Here in the Champlain Valley, we’re particularly aware of efforts to reduce phosphorus runoff into Lake Champlain.” 

The digester project is currently in the permitting phase. Once permits are in place, Vanguard will begin construction on the digester and Vermont Gas will start work on a 5-mile pipeline along Shard Villa Road that connects the farm with the company’s pipeline network in Addison County.

The Goodrich Family Farm anaerobic digester will produce the largest amount of energy or RNG of any digester in Vermont. It will process 100 tons of manure from the farm and 165 tons of organic food waste per day. Vanguard plans to source the organic food waste from local and Vermont-based food manufacturers including Cabot Creamery. 

Vanguard Renewables and Agri-Mark Cabot Creamery Cooperative won the 2016 American Biogas Council Agricultural Project of the Year for the Farm Powered* anaerobic digester project at Barstow’s Longview Farm in Hadley, Mass.

The Goodrich Farm digester will produce 140,000 Mcf per year. (A Mcf is 1,000 cubic feet of Renewable Natural Gas.) The College will buy 100,000 Mcf of the gas from Vanguard and Vermont Gas will purchase the remainder.

Once the digester is operating, the College will use oil at its heating plant only as a back-up energy source during extreme cold weather or other emergency situations. 

“We’re especially excited about this project because it’s our first partnership with a college and our first digester in Vermont,” said John Hanselman, executive chairman of Vanguard. “Middlebury College, Goodrich Farm, and Vermont Gas are setting a new example that can be replicated across the country.”

“We are thrilled to be a part of this unique and innovative project that will deliver a new, local source of renewable energy to Middlebury College and others,” said Don Rendall, president and CEO of Vermont Gas. “Vermont Gas is proud to be the first local distribution company in the country to offer the choice of renewable natural gas service to our customers. A local source, hosted by a Vermont family farm, serving a world-renowned Vermont college, is a big step forward in advancing Vermont’s clean energy future.”

Jack Byrne, director of sustainability integration at the College, noted that the project would also offer valuable academic benefits for Middlebury students and faculty. “This is an important step for Middlebury College from an operational standpoint but it will also offer multiple educational and research opportunities for our students just as our biomass plant has,” said Byrne.

*Farm Powered is a trademark of Vanguard Renewables. 

About Middlebury College
Founded in 1800, Middlebury is unique in being a classic liberal arts college that also offers graduate and specialized programs operating around the world. Although its international focus is strong, Middlebury is rooted in Vermont, where its history is entwined with the state, Addison County, and the town of Middlebury where it is located. Middlebury has established itself as a leader in campus environmental initiatives, with an accompanying educational focus on environmental issues in Vermont and around the globe. 

About Vanguard Renewables
The Vanguard Renewables Farm Powered Organics to Energy Lifecycle solves organic waste disposal challenges and supports the American farmer. Our scalable, closed-loop Farm Powered anaerobic digestion process converts farm and food waste into energy. 

About Vermont Gas
Vermont Gas Systems is a leader in energy efficiency and innovation, offering a clean, safe, affordable choice for over 50,000 homes, businesses, and institutions in Franklin, Chittenden and Addison counties. The company plays an important role in Vermont’s clean energy future by displacing higher-emitting fuels and with its award-winning energy efficiency programs.

Digester Project Fact Sheet

Who is Vanguard Renewables?

Vanguard Renewables develops, constructs, owns, and operates Farm Powered Anaerobic Digestion (AD) facilities that provide a closed loop organics (food and agricultural waste) to energy lifecycle solution. Our digesters sustain American farms, enable organic waste ban compliance, reduce Green House Gas and phosphorus, and produce renewable clean energy.

Farm Powered Anaerobic Digester Project at Goodrich Family Dairy Farm

Location Construction

  • Located in Salisbury, Vt., Addison County. 5.6 miles from Middlebury College and Cabot’s largest cheese factory
  • Plan to construct a 140,000 Mcf/y facility at Goodrich Family Farm

Farm Facts: Goodrich Family Farm, Salisbury, Vermont

  • Generational Vermont dairy farm owned and operated by the Goodrich family
  • 900 milking cows on site
  • 1750 acres of hay and 650 acres of corn

Utility: Vermont Gas

  • Vermont Gas Service to extend existing gas line 5.0 miles to the farm

Project Inputs: Feedstock

  • Manure ~ 100 tons per day
  • Organics ~ 165 tons per day

Project Outputs: RNG (Renewable Natural Gas) and Electricity

  • 140,000 Mcf/y of baseload Renewable Natural Gas for pipeline injection
  • 500kW of Renewable Electricity

Farm Benefits

  • Annual lease payment for land use
  • Reduced energy costs
  • Free heat for farm use
  • Liquid fertilizer to increase crop yields and reduce chemical fertilizer use
  • Separated solids for animal bedding
  • Phosphorus reduction
  • Reduced GHG emissions

Source: Middlebury College 11.16.2017

Hanergy Named "Top 25 Global Renewable Energy Leader" by …

BEIJING, Nov. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Multinational mass media and information firm Thomson Reuters published its “Top 100 Global Energy Leaders” list on November 14, 2017, naming Hanergy Thin Film Power Group(“Hanergy”) as an honoree in the Renewable Energy subsector. Hanergy appeared on the list of “Top 25 Global Renewable Energy Leaders” as the sole Chinese thin-film solar company.

Amid an increasingly complex and crowded business environment, Thomson Reuters pioneered a first-of-its-kind evaluation framework that incorporates an objective method for selecting honorees, evaluating companies across eight pillars of performance: Financial Performance, Management Investor Confidence; Innovation; Legal Compliance; Environmental Impact; People Social Responsibility; Reputation; and Risk Resilience. Honorees were selected from a pool of over 1500 evaluated companies.

Hanergy issued a statement about the announcement: “We are thrilled to receive this honor from Thomson Reuters, a world leading information firm. To be honored alongside so many global leaders in the field of renewable energy is a true testament to the world-class innovation embodied in our thin-film solar technology and our bright prospects for future growth.”

This year, Hanergy has made many exciting advances in the field of thin film solar technology. Hanergy’s newly launched Hantile solution, a product combining highly efficient solar panels with traditional roof tile, boasts an industry leading conversion efficiency of 17.5% and promises to make the construction industry more eco-friendly. Hanergy has cooperated with Slovenian aerospace solutions provider Alta Devices to apply thin-film solar panels to the company’s next-generation drones, extending their flight time by two hours. This year Hanergy also worked with German car manufacturer Audi to integrate solar cells into panoramic glass automobile roofs.

Media contact

Danning Wang
Email: rel=”nofollow”wangdanning@hanergy.com
Phone: +86(10) 83914567 ext 3118

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hanergy-named-top-25-global-renewable-energy-leader-by-thomson-reuters-300560803.html

SOURCE Hanergy Holding Group

TowerJazz Broadens Green Initiatives in its Specialty Analog Foundry Business by Increasing Renewable Energy …

Expanding reduction in power by installing solar panels in a nearly 100,000 square foot area with estimated 1700MWh yearly production of renewable green energy

MIGDAL HAEMEK, Israel, November 20, 2017 – TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, today announced its increased presence into renewable energy and green initiatives for its specialty IC analog foundry business with a roadmap of several initiatives for infrastructure improvement, furthering its activities in becoming a more eco-friendly and green company. TowerJazz has invested in several key projects in company fabrication sites which enable improvement in water and electricity usage.

TowerJazz has finalized an agreement to install solar panels in areas comprising nearly 100,000 square feet. The yearly production of renewal green energy is estimated to be 1700MWh which equals 4.5 days of the facility’s consumption and a year’s consumption of about 100 private residences. Construction is set to begin in January 2018 and to be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2018.

In addition to the solar project, several global initiatives have resulted in electricity savings of 18,000 MWh/year. Projects included: installing smart devices that regulate power consumption, upgrading chillers which are used to control temperature (important in the production of semiconductor devices), replacing the cooling tower, and replacing neon light bulbs with LED bulbs to reduce electricity consumption. The total electricity savings per year is equivalent to annual electricity consumption of about 1600 private households or 16 million pounds of coal burned.

TowerJazz has also implemented creative recycling projects leading to overall water consumption reduction. A total of 74,500 m3/year were reduced, which is equal to the annual water consumption of a town with a population of 2,100 people.

“We are very pleased with all of the results we are seeing from our initiatives to strengthen our “green” focus as an environmentally friendly company. We continue to perform ongoing efforts in all of our operations to reduce environmental impact and implement forward-thinking policies for environmental concerns,” said Rafi Mor, Chief Operating Officer.

About TowerJazz
Tower Semiconductor Ltd. (NASDAQ: TSEM, TASE: TSEM) and its subsidiaries operate collectively under the brand name TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader. TowerJazz manufactures next-generation integrated circuits (ICs) in growing markets such as consumer, industrial, automotive, medical and aerospace and defense. TowerJazz’s advanced technology is comprised of a broad range of customizable process platforms such as: SiGe, BiCMOS, mixed-signal/CMOS, RF CMOS, CMOS image sensor, integrated power management (BCD and 700V), and MEMS. TowerJazz also provides world-class design enablement for a quick and accurate design cycle as well as Transfer Optimization and development Process Services (TOPS) to IDMs and fabless companies that need to expand capacity. To provide multi-fab sourcing and extended capacity for its customers, TowerJazz operates two manufacturing facilities in Israel (150mm and 200mm), two in the U.S. (200mm) and three facilities in Japan (two 200mm and one 300mm). For more information, please visit www.towerjazz.com.

Safe Harbor Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This press release includes forward-looking statements, which are subject to risks and uncertainties. Actual results may vary from those projected or implied by such forward-looking statements. A complete discussion of risks and uncertainties that may affect the accuracy of forward-looking statements included in this press release or which may otherwise affect TowerJazz’s business is included under the heading “Risk Factors” in Tower’s most recent filings on Forms 20-F, F-3, F-4 and 6-K, as were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and the Israel Securities Authority and Jazz’s most recent filings on Forms 10-K and 10-Q, as were filed with the SEC, respectively. Tower and Jazz do not intend to update, and expressly disclaim any obligation to update, the information contained in this release.

###

TowerJazz Company Contact: Lauri Julian | +1 949-280-5602 | lauri.julian@towerjazz.com
TowerJazz Investor Relations Contact: Noit Levi | +972-4-604-7066 | noit.levi@towerjazz.com

Attachments:

http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1a909b21-4120-4798-9b74-37adc01b622f

UPS Dramatically Increases Use Of Renewable Natural Gas

UPS Agreement for 10 Million Gallon Equivalents a Year with Big Ox Energy is its Largest Commitment to Date

ATLANTA, Nov. 20, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —  UPS (NYSE: UPS) today announced an agreement with Big Ox Energy (a wholly owned subsidiary of Environmental Energy Capital LLC) to purchase 10 million gallon equivalents of renewable natural gas (RNG) per year. This is the largest investment in RNG to date for the company, and the agreement runs through 2024. Use of RNG yields up to a 90% reduction in lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions when compared to conventional diesel.

In addition to the agreement with Big Ox, UPS signed a five-year agreement earlier this year with AMP energy for 1.5 million gallon equivalents of RNG per year from the Fair Oaks dairy farm in Indiana. The RNG agreements will help UPS reach a key sustainability goal: 40 percent of all ground transportation fleet fuel from sources other than conventional gasoline and diesel by 2025.

“Natural gas is a proven alternative fuel to gasoline and diesel and is a key building block for our goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in our ground fleet,” said  Mike Casteel, UPS director of fleet procurement. “These agreements add significantly to our investment in the use of RNG and will help put us on track to nearly triple our annual use of RNG. They are also a direct reflection of our ongoing commitment to help shape the renewable natural gas industry.”

UPS fueling stations in Lexington, Ky.; Louisville, Ky.; New Stanton, Pa.; Richmond, Va.; Roanoke, Va.; West Columbia, S.C.; Horsham, Pa. and Doraville, Ga. will use the Bix Ox RNG to fuel UPS® delivery vehicles and tractors.

RNG, also known as biomethane, can be derived from many abundant and renewable sources, including decomposing organic waste in landfills, wastewater treatment and agriculture. It is then distributed through the natural gas pipeline system, making it available for use as liquefied natural gas (LNG) or compressed natural gas (CNG).

“UPS continues to make investments in renewable natural gas that help move the industry forward,” said Rob Larsen, CEO of Big Ox Energy. “Our agreement with UPS is one of the largest contracts we have signed to date and among the largest ever in the RNG market.”

UPS used 61 million gallons of natural gas in its ground fleet in 2016, which included 4.6 million gallons of RNG and is on track to use 14 million gallons of RNG in 2017. UPS drives more than 5,200 CNG and LNG vehicles in its fleet of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Earlier this year, UPS announced a more than $90 million investment in natural gas vehicles and infrastructure. This investment included an additional six compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations, 390 new CNG tractors and terminal trucks, and 250 liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicles.

Since 2009, UPS has invested more than $750 million in alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling stations globally. UPS deploys the more than 8,500 vehicles in its Rolling Lab to utilize technologies that work best depending on the needs of the delivery route. From old-fashioned pedal power and electric-assisted bicycles in dense urban areas like London and Hamburg to electric and hybrid electric vehicles in the U.S., and natural gas, renewable natural gas and propane globally, UPS puts sustainability innovation into action, all over the world.

About Big Ox Energy
Big Ox Energy’s mission is to be a sustainable, scalable, and cost-competitive waste recycling provider. Big Ox Energy converts organic  waste from municipal waste water facilities, agriculture, and food processing into clean-burning, pipeline-grade, renewable natural gas, known as “green gas, and other useful by-products.” Good for the economy, the environment, and the industries it supports, “green gas” is a renewable, domestic energy source.

About Environmental Energy Capital, LLC
Environmental Energy Capital LLC’s (EEC’s) mission is to utilize private capital efficiently to build energy and infrastructure projects that promote sustainability and address energy, climate and environmental challenges.  EEC’s initial focus is on scaling the production of renewable natural gas by developing, owning and operating  facilities that create biogas and other useful products from diverse organic waste streams.

About UPS
UPS (NYSE) is a global leader in logistics, offering a broad range of solutions transporting packages and freight; facilitating international trade, and deploying advanced technology to more efficiently manage the world of business. UPS is committed to operating more sustainably – for customers, the environment and the communities we serve around the world.  Learn more about our efforts at ups.com/sustainability. Headquartered in Atlanta, UPS serves more than 220 countries and territories worldwide. The company can be found on the web at ups.com and its corporate blog can be found at longitudes.ups.com. To get UPS news direct, follow @UPS_News on Twitter.

Kristen Petrella
404-828-4182
Kpetrella@ups.com

Important Downtown Dallas Restoration Project Looks Up For Green …

DALLAS, Nov. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – A once-abandoned building on the edge of Downtown is being reincarnated as an eco-friendly, people-friendly mixed-use destination that offers coworking, loft living, green space, commercial office space and a coffee shop, and developers have been awarded a $300,000 grant to install a solar system to power the new venture.

The 60,000-square foot building, built in the 1930s and expanded in the late 1950s, is located at 1808 S. Good Latimer Expy. in East Cedars, near the Farmer’s Market. Renovations began February 2016, and the building is expected to be ready for occupancy January 2018. One of the nation’s premier green architectural design firms, GGO Architects, led by Gary Olp, FAIA and LEED Fellow, designed and directed the renovation of the project in partnership with GoodWork, led by Amy King, a company dedicated to incubating healthy environments for working and living.

“1808 from its conception is an innovative mixed-use re-development. Our goal is a coworking, business and residential community built around the synergies of design, business and sustainability,” said Steve Kinder, 1808 building owner and CEO Founder of LOFTwall. “As we worked with our partners to pursue LEED Certification, solar was on our wish list.” The solar dream became a reality when the Dallas nonprofit group Downwinders at Risk (www.downwindersatrisk.org) chose the 1808 project to receive the final grant from their Sue Pope Fund for Pollution Reduction.

Dallas-based Sunfinity Solar (www.sunfinitysolar.com), a company serving residential and commercial solar customers, has been selected to design and manage the system installation. John Billingsley, Chief Executive Officer of Sunfinity Solar, says that this installation will be one of a small handful of solar systems operating in the downtown area.  

“The vision of the 1808 leadership team and the opportunity to help take a building from the early 20th century into the 21st century make this a unique, appealing project, and we’re very honored to be part of it,” said Billingsley.

The Sunfinity System will include 454 panels (149.8 kW) that will provide 45.8% of the building’s power needs and feed excess power produced back to the electric grid. Over 20 years, this solar system is estimated by the Department of Energy to offset:

  • 3,022 metric tons of carbon dioxide
  • 24,000 pounds of SO2 (sulfur dioxide)
  • 12,000 pounds of NOx (nitrogen oxide)
  • 172,000 milligrams of mercury

The carbon sequestered is equivalent to taking 638 cars off the road for a year, planting 78,317 trees over 10 years or preserving 24.1 acres of U.S. forests from conversion to cropland in one year.

“Solar power makes sense for businesses of all sizes – from for-profit concerns to schools and non-profits – for the same reasons that it appeals to homeowners,” said Billingsley, who notes that Texas is particularly suited for solar. According to GoSolarTexas, Texas has the second greatest technical potential for photovoltaic (PV) rooftop installations given its location in the Southwest and relatively low tree coverage.

“The potential financial savings are impressive, and they go on for years,” Billingsley added.  “Solar is about choice, and businesses have the choice to be energy independent by owning their own power and locking in a percentage of their building’s needs for 30-plus years.

“The environmental benefits are just as compelling, since solar taps a clean, endlessly renewable energy source that doesn’t require other resources, like water and fuels, to produce or transport.”

When asked why this project was compelling, Architect Gary Olp said, “It has been rewarding to take this building from a dilapidated, overlooked, abandoned building and transform it to one of the most healthy working and living environments in Dallas.”

ABOUT 1808 / GoodWork
The mixed-use redevelopment at 1808 S Good Latimer Expy. is a building for independent collaborators, growing businesses and community cultivators. Along with its coworking partner GoodWork, this 1808 historic warehouse in the Cedars — a creative and industrial sector on the edge of Downtown Dallas — has a vision to create a community built around the synergies of design, business, and sustainability. 1808 features a variety of work places and amenities inspired by nature — encouraging movement, wellness, creativity and collaboration. It offers two green courtyards, a coffee shop, event space, coworking, 2nd floor office space, and hotel/residence loft living. The building is being designed with environmentally and wellness-friendly features paramount. It is pursuing both LEED and WELL Buildingâ„¢ certification. www.1808.biz; www.goodwork.co

ABOUT GGOArchitects, Corp.
GGOArchitects (www.ggoarchitects.com) is an innovative, environmentally focused studio. The practice was founded to effect a fundamental change in the application of the craft of architecture based on an understanding of environmental stewardship. The efforts of the award-winning studio reflect an enterprising approach to energy efficiency, passive solar techniques, natural day lighting and enhanced fresh air systems with an emphasis on reducing construction waste and the use of natural, non-toxic building materials.

ABOUT Sunfinity Solar
Sunfinity Solar (www.sunfinitysolar.com) is headquartered in Dallas with full-service operations throughout California and North Texas and active expansion in Texas and other states. Sunfinity Solar offers complete system design (solar panels, inverter and metering), installation (including handling all permits and inspections), financing and ongoing system support for residences, businesses and agricultural concerns of any size that want to realize the many financial and environmental benefits of solar power.

 

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/important-downtown-dallas-restoration-project-looks-up-for-green-power-300558048.html

SOURCE Sunfinity Solar

China’s renewable energy wastage targets may be hard to meet this winter: NEA

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s target to “effectively alleviate” renewable power waste remains under pressure despite Beijing’s progress in boosting renewable energy consumption in the first three quarters of the year, the National Energy Administration (NEA) said in a statement on Tuesday.

“Winter is typically the toughest season for power generated from wind farms and solar plants to connect to the grids. Some regions will face pressure to prevent a rebound of wind and solar waste rates,” said the NEA in the statement.

Power waste is caused when there is not enough transmission capacity to absorb the electricity generated by wind, solar and hydro-power plants, leading to high curtailment rates, particularly in northwestern and southwestern China.

While the hydro-power utilization rates in the southwestern provinces of Sichuan, Guangxi and Yunan have climbed 2 percentage points during the first three quarters of 2017, the transmission grid may not be able to absorb more of the hydro-power that will be available as the region comes to the end of the flood season, the NEA said.

Still, the wind curtailment rate across the country dropped 6.7 percentage points between January and September compared to the same period a year ago, while the solar waste rate decreased 4 percentage point, the NEA said.

The risks of high power curtailment remain high in Gansu and Xinjiang province where more than 20 percent of solar power and around 30 percent of wind power was wasted in the first nine months.

Solar power waste rates rose in the smog-prone region of Hebei, Shanxi, Shandong and Shaanxi province, the NEA said without giving a reason for the increase.

“Local authorities and grid companies should pay high-attention to curb power waste in the renewable energy sectors,” said the NEA.

The NEA will continue to promote renewable energy consumption by encouraging power generators to trade with heating companies.

China has planned to eliminate 44,000 coal-fired industrial boilers and switch households to natural gas or electric heating.

The NEA will also further boost cross-region power transmission and power trade by improving transmission capacity from the provinces of Xinjiang to Henan, from Ningxia to Zhejiang and from Gansu to Hunan.

On Monday, the NEA issued a statement saying China aims to stop all renewable energy wastage by 2020.

Reporting by Muyu Xu and Beijing Newsroom; Editing by Christian Schmollinger

Important Downtown Dallas Restoration Project Looks Up For Green Power

DALLAS, Nov. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – A once-abandoned building on the edge of Downtown is being reincarnated as an eco-friendly, people-friendly mixed-use destination that offers coworking, loft living, green space, commercial office space and a coffee shop, and developers have been awarded a $300,000 grant to install a solar system to power the new venture.

The 60,000-square foot building, built in the 1930s and expanded in the late 1950s, is located at 1808 S. Good Latimer Expy. in East Cedars, near the Farmer’s Market. Renovations began February 2016, and the building is expected to be ready for occupancy January 2018. One of the nation’s premier green architectural design firms, GGO Architects, led by Gary Olp, FAIA and LEED Fellow, designed and directed the renovation of the project in partnership with GoodWork, led by Amy King, a company dedicated to incubating healthy environments for working and living.

“1808 from its conception is an innovative mixed-use re-development. Our goal is a coworking, business and residential community built around the synergies of design, business and sustainability,” said Steve Kinder, 1808 building owner and CEO Founder of LOFTwall. “As we worked with our partners to pursue LEED Certification, solar was on our wish list.” The solar dream became a reality when the Dallas nonprofit group Downwinders at Risk (www.downwindersatrisk.org) chose the 1808 project to receive the final grant from their Sue Pope Fund for Pollution Reduction.

Dallas-based Sunfinity Solar (www.sunfinitysolar.com), a company serving residential and commercial solar customers, has been selected to design and manage the system installation. John Billingsley, Chief Executive Officer of Sunfinity Solar, says that this installation will be one of a small handful of solar systems operating in the downtown area.  

“The vision of the 1808 leadership team and the opportunity to help take a building from the early 20th century into the 21st century make this a unique, appealing project, and we’re very honored to be part of it,” said Billingsley.

The Sunfinity System will include 454 panels (149.8 kW) that will provide 45.8% of the building’s power needs and feed excess power produced back to the electric grid. Over 20 years, this solar system is estimated by the Department of Energy to offset:

  • 3,022 metric tons of carbon dioxide
  • 24,000 pounds of SO2 (sulfur dioxide)
  • 12,000 pounds of NOx (nitrogen oxide)
  • 172,000 milligrams of mercury

The carbon sequestered is equivalent to taking 638 cars off the road for a year, planting 78,317 trees over 10 years or preserving 24.1 acres of U.S. forests from conversion to cropland in one year.

“Solar power makes sense for businesses of all sizes – from for-profit concerns to schools and non-profits – for the same reasons that it appeals to homeowners,” said Billingsley, who notes that Texas is particularly suited for solar. According to GoSolarTexas, Texas has the second greatest technical potential for photovoltaic (PV) rooftop installations given its location in the Southwest and relatively low tree coverage.

“The potential financial savings are impressive, and they go on for years,” Billingsley added.  “Solar is about choice, and businesses have the choice to be energy independent by owning their own power and locking in a percentage of their building’s needs for 30-plus years.

“The environmental benefits are just as compelling, since solar taps a clean, endlessly renewable energy source that doesn’t require other resources, like water and fuels, to produce or transport.”

When asked why this project was compelling, Architect Gary Olp said, “It has been rewarding to take this building from a dilapidated, overlooked, abandoned building and transform it to one of the most healthy working and living environments in Dallas.”

ABOUT 1808 / GoodWork
The mixed-use redevelopment at 1808 S Good Latimer Expy. is a building for independent collaborators, growing businesses and community cultivators. Along with its coworking partner GoodWork, this 1808 historic warehouse in the Cedars — a creative and industrial sector on the edge of Downtown Dallas — has a vision to create a community built around the synergies of design, business, and sustainability. 1808 features a variety of work places and amenities inspired by nature — encouraging movement, wellness, creativity and collaboration. It offers two green courtyards, a coffee shop, event space, coworking, 2nd floor office space, and hotel/residence loft living. The building is being designed with environmentally and wellness-friendly features paramount. It is pursuing both LEED and WELL Buildingâ„¢ certification. www.1808.biz; www.goodwork.co

ABOUT GGOArchitects, Corp.
GGOArchitects (www.ggoarchitects.com) is an innovative, environmentally focused studio. The practice was founded to effect a fundamental change in the application of the craft of architecture based on an understanding of environmental stewardship. The efforts of the award-winning studio reflect an enterprising approach to energy efficiency, passive solar techniques, natural day lighting and enhanced fresh air systems with an emphasis on reducing construction waste and the use of natural, non-toxic building materials.

ABOUT Sunfinity Solar
Sunfinity Solar (www.sunfinitysolar.com) is headquartered in Dallas with full-service operations throughout California and North Texas and active expansion in Texas and other states. Sunfinity Solar offers complete system design (solar panels, inverter and metering), installation (including handling all permits and inspections), financing and ongoing system support for residences, businesses and agricultural concerns of any size that want to realize the many financial and environmental benefits of solar power.

 

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/important-downtown-dallas-restoration-project-looks-up-for-green-power-300558048.html

SOURCE Sunfinity Solar

The inaugural WAFX Prize salutes sustainable designs

From a hydroelectric canal that addresses rising sea levels to a tower of renewable energy, architecture is going eco-friendly.

The two projects above are among the winners of the inaugural WAFX Prize, part of the World Architecture Festival’s (WAF) 10th anniversary celebrations. Prizes went to future projects that identify key challenges for architects over the next 10 years.

WAF 2017 will be held at the Arena Berlin in Germany from tomorrow and will run for three days. WAF organisers have also launched the WAF Manifesto, which identifies key future challenges including climate, energy and carbon; water; ageing and health; re-use; smart city technology; building technology; cultural identity; ethics and values; power and justice; and virtual worlds.

There are 11 future project winners which critically address the Manifesto issues.

(All photos come from the project proponents.)

1. Hydroelectric Canal by Paul Lukez Architecture

Emerging as overall winner is this Hydroelectric Canal which also won the Climate, Energy and Carbon prize.

This project addresses the complex issue of rising sea levels and protects Boston’s (United States of America) low-lying harbour areas from flooding.

When rising tides or storm surges occur, water will be channelled from the canal to recreational parks, which also act as reservoirs.

Hydroelectric turbines will generate power from the tidal changes, providing clean energy for the communities there.

The project also plans to restore 2.32mil sq m of salt marshes.

Floating Ponds, the Water prize winner.

2. Floating Ponds by Surbana Jurong Consultants.

This Singaporean company aims to do away with land for farming, something that will be welcomed by high-density cities, through creative use of space.

Awarded winner of the Water prize, the Floating Ponds project goes for a systemic integration of water, nutrients and energy to enable the creation of a self-sustained and closed loop farming eco-system.

It taps solar energy to grow algae – which will be used to feed fish – on rooftops.

The nutrient-rich water from the fish-algae tanks can then be used to grow vegetables. The plan is for more than 90% of the tanks’ water to be recycled, reducing the need to add fresh water.

Taking home the Building Technology prize is Germany’s Energiepark Heidelberg project.

3. Energiepark Heidelberg by LAVA Berlin.

A 1950s gas tank is transformed into an “energy tower”. It will store water heated by solar and wind generators, which will then be channelled to local homes.

It also has an eye-catching facade created from 11,000 diamond-shaped plates, that are attached to a steel cable network, creating a veil that shifts in the wind.

Beneath the veil, a staircase will wrap around an insulating inner shell of mineral wool in different shades of blue. This project, based in Heidelberg, Germany, is the winner of the Building Technology prize.

One of three winners of the Smart Cities prize is Jakarta Jaya: The Green Manhattan by SHAU.

4a. Jakarta Jaya: The Green Manhattan by SHAU

Jakarta Jaya is based on creating a giant reclaimed island 58sq km in size in the sea off Indonesia’s capital. It’s one of three winners of the WAFX Smart Cities prize.

Billed as a “sustainable city” or “Green Manhattan”, it’s designed for a population of 1.9 million and looks at a multitude of ecological and social projects.

The master plan includes an integrated water system that uses the river to prevent floods in Jakarta. In addition, emphasis will be given to public transport, renewable energy and the minimising of waste.

Solar powered cars will be allocated to the population at a ratio of 1:10 while water transportation will also be a part of the plan.

Media City, located in Istanbul, Turkey, also won the Smart Cities award.

4b. Media City by Gad Architecture

Another Smart City winner is Media City, which is set to be a vibrant new habitat in Istanbul where people can witness the design, production and application of virtual reality and multimedia products. It aims to be an example for future smart city strategies.

The third project to win the Smart Cities prize is Oresund City.

4c. Oresund City by Sweco Architects AB

Oresund City is based on the vision of using a new archipelago to join Copenhagen, Denmark and Malmo, Sweden to form an entirely new city. This co-winner of the Smart City prize promises to be a new European metropolis by 2030.

Sodra Skanstull was awarded the Ageing and Health prize.

5. Södra Skanstull by White Arkitekter

This proposal, located south of Stockholm, Sweden, highlights how promoting walkability is at the heart of future people-centred sustainable cities.

Winner of the Ageing and Health prize, Sodra Skanstull will consist of a new masterplan where the focal point is a new diagonal boulevard for pedestrians and cyclists, which makes use of an old railway route, and improves public movement through the area.

The Ethics prize went to Whitmore Community Food Hub Complex.

6. Whitmore Community Food Hub by University of Arkansas Community Design Centre

This project theme is “building community around food”. It will provide processing and distribution support for the agricultural community around O’ahu, Hawaii.

The 37,160sqm Food Hub will also meet additional community needs such as agricultural workforce housing, retail and local business incubation.

The visitor entrance combines a canopy, public arcade, and roof garden to facilitate cultural tourism while inside the entrance is a cafe with a hanging garden above.

On the Neighborhood Lawn, treatment ponds upcycle stormwater runoff and grey water discharged by the Food Hub. This project was awarded the Ethics prize.

The Cultural Identity prize winner is the Lagos’s Wooden Tower.

7. Lagos’s Wooden Tower by Hermann Kamte Associates

Winner of the Cultural Identity prize, this proposal aims to create a new generation of city living in densely populated Lagos, Nigeria.

The wooden residential tower is built with high-resistance engineered timber and features smart and sustainable features. It maximises daylight and natural ventilation while the wooden facade, inspired by Yoruba tribal tattoos, shades the building from the sun’s heat.

Each floor incorporates soothing green plants which will help freshen the air while maintaining a constant microclimate within the living space.

Winner of the Re-use prize: I Love Nydalen.

8. I Love Nydalen by SAAHA AS

This proposal maps out how the historic industrial buildings in the Nydalsveien 32B area of Oslo, Norway, can be preserved and redeveloped with housing, to enable active and vibrant city life.

The centre of the district will be transformed into a greenhouse, a common and shared space for both residents and the general public. Winner of the Re-use prize.

The Revolution 4.0 project won the Power and Justice prize.

9. Revolution 4.0 by Abdullah Ahmed N Al-Dabbous

Selected as the winner of the Power and Justice prize, the project utilises Cairo’s unused urban spaces such as motorway flyovers to provide both learning and opportunities for advancement for street children. It aims to engage with the children and treat them as positive economic assets rather than liabilities.

China to resolve renewable energy waste problem by 2020: NEA

BEIJING (Reuters) – China aims to prevent power generated by its renewable energy sector being wasted by 2020, the country’s National Energy Administration (NEA) said on Monday.

Power from wind, solar and hydro plants is often wasted as there is not enough transmission capacity to absorb it, leading to high curtailment rates, especially in northwestern China.

The NEA said in a statement that the utilization rate of hydro-power plants in the southwestern provinces of Yunnan and Sichuan should reach around 90 percent by 2017.

It expects the wind power curtailment rate to drop to about 30 percent in the northwestern provinces of Gansu and Xinjiang and to around 20 percent in the northeastern region of Jilin, Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia in 2017.

Solar power waste in Gansu and Xinjiang provinces should be controlled below around 20 percent and in Shaanxi and Qinghai to below 10 percent this year, it added.

Power generated from wind and solar power plants in other regions across the country will have to meet the 2017 targets set by the NEA last year, it said in the statement.

China has vowed to raise the portion of its renewable and non-fossil fuel power consumption to 15 percent of total energy mix by 2020 and 20 percent by 2030.

It also said that it will promote the power trade market and improve its cross-region power transmission capacity to boost renewable energy consumption and cut its coal dependence.

Coal-fired power capacity across the country will be capped at 1.1 billion kilowatt-hours by 2020, the NEA said.

Reporting by Muyu Xu and Beijing Newsroom; Editing by Tom Hogue

How The US Subsidized China To Produce Eco-Unfriendly Solar …

Shutterstock

The US is about to fire another salvo in the international trade war, and this one may actually make sense.

That’s because the US government will, if President Trump approves, help an industry it almost destroyed a few years ago.

And stranger yet, this policy puts the Trump administration and environmentalist groups on the same side.

They say politics makes strange bedfellows. Trade policy does too,and it points to an investment trend you should follow.

US Solar Panel Manufacturers at a Disadvantage

In Connecting the Dots I try to find stories that fit together in unexpected ways. Sometimes I don’t even have to look.

Two weeks ago, I wrote about free trade and manufacturing jobs. Last week’s topic was renewable energy. Today, we have all three.

As you may have noticed in your neighborhood, rooftop solar panels are gaining popularity. People and businesses like them because they save money and help the environment at the same time.

Installing those panels is a growing business. Making them isn’t, at least for American companies. They have been unable to compete with low-cost panels imported from China.

In September, the US International Trade Commission ruled that US solar panel manufacturers had been seriously injured by foreign competition. The ITC later recommended President Trump impose up to 35% tariffs on imported solar panels.

We don’t know what Trump will do, but the more interesting question is why Chinese solar panels have this cost advantage.

Subsidizing Your Own Competitors

It turns out, the US government actually paid the Chinese huge subsidies to make the same solar panels it now says are unfair competition.

Weird?

Yes.

And it gets weirder.

Back in January 2009, when President Obama came into office, he pledged to revive the recession-afflicted economy with a fiscal stimulus plan.

Congress obliged by passing the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Among other things, this gave a generous tax credit to clean-energy companies.

These were supposed to be American companies using American-made components. While that’s mostly the case, a few companies found a loophole. International Business Times reported on it last week.

To earn the tax credits, projects had to be based in the U.S., and a “Buy America” clause was included to boost domestic manufacturing. But the clause had a loophole: It would be waived if “the relevant manufactured goods are not produced in the United States in sufficient and reasonably available quantities.” Because of the relatively small solar manufacturing capacity in the U.S., domestic solar installation companies receiving stimulus money would be allowed to purchase panels from overseas, undercutting U.S. manufacturers.

But that’s not all — while roughly 70 percent of the grant recipients were American companies, there were at least 17 foreign-based companies receiving 48C tax credits that had already arranged for solar or wind manufacturing operations in low-wage nations, according to a 2010 report from a project of the BlueGreen Alliance Foundation, an environmental nonprofit. Six U.S. companies that were awarded tax credits, including First Solar and Sun Power, already had manufacturing operations in low-wage, East Asian countries such as China, Malaysia and the Philippines.

So instead of boosting US solar manufacturing, the government essentially paid companies to import them from abroad.

That wasn’t entirely crazy: lower prices led more homeowners and businesses to buy solar panels. That meant more jobs installing them, but it also gave foreign manufacturers an edge over US companies.

What customers didn’t know was that their imported panels might actually create more of the same greenhouse gases they wanted to reduce.

Eco-Unfriendly Solar Panels

Some of the Asian countries making solar panels for US customers are not particularly “green.” They burn a lot of coal to power the solar-panel factories.

Solar panels made in Asia are bulky and heavy and come to the US on diesel-burning cargo ships. Portions of these panels even cross the Pacific twice.

Asian manufacturers import polysilicon, an important raw material, from mines in the United States. Then the same polysilicon comes back to the US in completed panels.

Experts interviewed by IBT estimate it takes about nine years for an imported solar panel installed on a US roof to recover the greenhouse gas emissions involved in manufacturing and transporting it.

That’s a problem when one of your key selling points is that your product helps protect the environment.

If you’re an American who wants truly eco-friendly solar panels, you should buy US-made ones that didn’t take a pre-installation world tour.

Which brings us back to President Trump.

Trading the Localization Trend

If Trump imposes tariffs on foreign solar panels, it will both help US manufacturers and please environmentalist groups. On the other hand, it may also raise prices and therefore reduce growth in what had been a bright spot for US blue-collar job creation.

So none of the solutions are perfect—trade policy rarely is. But I think this one points to a larger economic trend: localization.

Tariffs or not, solar-panel manufacturing will probably return to the US anyway. Trade sanctions will just speed it up by a few years. Cheap Asian labor no longer has the competitive advantage it used to have.

Factory robots don’t care where you put them. They cost about the same and work equally hard on either side of the Pacific.

As automation continues, I think we’ll see manufacturing of all kinds move closer to the customer. Speed is replacing scale as the differentiator. Today’s businesses must respond to customers faster than ships can cross the ocean.

That has big implications for the manufacturing segment and beyond.

My colleague Robert Ross and I have been following this trend for over a year now. It’s given us some good option trade opportunities. I think the waves will go on for years—and the surfing will be great.